Calendars, Birds, & Our Candidates

            Will the Internet be great in 2008? Or, can we pc users expect more patches to keep bugs and hackers at bay? I’m still using a fairly “old” computer with Windows XP. From what I hear, the new Vista is not impressing anyone who now has it. And I remain in the dark ages, because I don’t IM, webcam, or use VOIP. Nor do I have any plans to do so. One big change I have made is resurrecting the CyberScribbles blog with clickable links for all you loyal readers. You’ll find it at https://cyberscribbles.wordpress.com.

Calendar Maker (www.mycalendarmaker.com). I forgot to purchase a desk calendar as we began the new year, so I decided to make a few weekly calendar sheets in the interim. I looked around at various free calendar makers on the ‘net, and this one is the easiest: no strings, simple to make, and no registering. You can choose from weekly, monthly or yearly versions, and can start at any date you wish. Your personal calendar is transformed into a .pdf file, and you can print from there.

Earth Hour (www.earthhour.org). Speaking of calendars, mark March 29 on yours now. At 8 pm that evening, folks around the globe will turn off their lights for an hour as a way to create “a positive tipping point” in the race to slow down global warming. This concept is a global attempt to replicate what the city of Melbourne, Australia started last year. At the Earth Hour website, individuals from businesses, town and city governments, and anyone else can pledge to get an awareness campaign started. You can watch a short video and see Melbourne go dark, as well as listen to appeals. Sounds like a good idea to me.

Birding Pal (www.birdingpal.org). Birders who travel can connect with local bird guides in a host of communities globally, thanks to this website. I noticed that Michigan had dozens of willing bird guides throughout the state, while Indiana’s numbers were lower. Maybe Hoosier birders have yet to discover this website, which also lists lodging options for birders all over the world. The site has great links, too. Read on for more.

What Bird? (www.whatbird.com). The trees are bare, so birders have an easier time spotting their feathered friends this time of year. If you are like me, you can spot them, listen to their birdsong, and still not know what you are seeing. Then comes a website like this to help us clueless observers. This is a wonderful reference source for all ages. To engage the interest of the younger set, there is an interactive game, “The Call of the Wild,” that lets you attempt to identify various birds from three different ecosystems: mountains, marshes and uplands. Plus, there are three levels of play, from easy to difficult. You can use virtual binoculars to zoom in, too.

Bird Feeder Cam (www.wbu.com/feedercam_home.htm). Live from Ithaca, New York, the Cornell Ornithology Lab has set up a webcam for us to watch what’s happening in a garden filled with bird feeders. If you’ve passed the quizzes at Call of the Wild, then you’ll have no trouble identifying the birds flying in and out of view. By the way, I plan to mention a different webcam location each week this year. I’m amazed at how many are available to Internet surfers.

 Election 2008 Astrology (www.thestrangehouse.com). Seems that all eyes have been on Iowa and New Hampshire lately. What is really interesting about this website is that it offers a daily horoscope for all the presidential candidates, as well as their horoscopes for Election Day. If you have the time and energy and inclination, you could check your favorite candidate’s horoscope and see how it matches up to what is being written up in the news as the countdown toward November approaches.

 

            Will the Internet be great in 2008? Or, can we pc users expect more patches to keep bugs and hackers at bay? I’m still using a fairly “old” computer with Windows XP. From what I hear, the new Vista is not impressing anyone who now has it. And I remain in the dark ages, because I don’t IM, webcam, or use VOIP. Nor do I have any plans to do so. One big change I have made is resurrecting the CyberScribbles blog with clickable links for all you loyal readers. You’ll find it at https://cyberscribbles.wordpress.com.

Calendar Maker (www.mycalendarmaker.com). I forgot to purchase a desk calendar as we began the new year, so I decided to make a few weekly calendar sheets in the interim. I looked around at various free calendar makers on the ‘net, and this one is the easiest: no strings, simple to make, and no registering. You can choose from weekly, monthly or yearly versions, and can start at any date you wish. Your personal calendar is transformed into a .pdf file, and you can print from there.

Earth Hour (www.earthhour.org). Speaking of calendars, mark March 29 on yours now. At 8 pm that evening, folks around the globe will turn off their lights for an hour as a way to create “a positive tipping point” in the race to slow down global warming. This concept is a global attempt to replicate what the city of Melbourne, Australia started last year. At the Earth Hour website, individuals from businesses, town and city governments, and anyone else can pledge to get an awareness campaign started. You can watch a short video and see Melbourne go dark, as well as listen to appeals. Sounds like a good idea to me.

Birding Pal (www.birdingpal.org). Birders who travel can connect with local bird guides in a host of communities globally, thanks to this website. I noticed that Michigan had dozens of willing bird guides throughout the state, while Indiana’s numbers were lower. Maybe Hoosier birders have yet to discover this website, which also lists lodging options for birders all over the world. The site has great links, too. Read on for more.

What Bird? (www.whatbird.com). The trees are bare, so birders have an easier time spotting their feathered friends this time of year. If you are like me, you can spot them, listen to their birdsong, and still not know what you are seeing. Then comes a website like this to help us clueless observers. This is a wonderful reference source for all ages. To engage the interest of the younger set, there is an interactive game, “The Call of the Wild,” that lets you attempt to identify various birds from three different ecosystems: mountains, marshes and uplands. Plus, there are three levels of play, from easy to difficult. You can use virtual binoculars to zoom in, too.

Bird Feeder Cam (www.wbu.com/feedercam_home.htm). Live from Ithaca, New York, the Cornell Ornithology Lab has set up a webcam for us to watch what’s happening in a garden filled with bird feeders. If you’ve passed the quizzes at Call of the Wild, then you’ll have no trouble identifying the birds flying in and out of view. By the way, I plan to mention a different webcam location each week this year. I’m amazed at how many are available to Internet surfers.

Election 2008 Astrology (www.thestrangehouse.com). Seems that all eyes have been on Iowa and New Hampshire lately. What is really interesting about this website is that it offers a daily horoscope for all the presidential candidates, as well as their horoscopes for Election Day. If you have the time and energy and inclination, you could check your favorite candidate’s horoscope and see how it matches up to what is being written up in the news as the countdown toward November approaches.

 

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~ by IndianaDunesPoet on January 8, 2008.

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